Category Archives: Tools

Hollow and Rounds in stock

Currently we have several pairs of hollow and rounds in our store.  These are tuned and ready to go out of the box.  All are beech and bedded at 55 degrees.  Sizes available as of this post are #2, #4, #8, and #12.  This corresponds to radius sizes of 1/8″, 1/4″, 1/2″, and 3/4″.  (The number of the plane is its radius in sixteenths of an inch.)  More information about our hollow and rounds can be found here.   Planes available for immediate purchase can be found in our store.

Of course, we can make any size for order too, in left or right hand, and bedded at 55 or 50 degrees..  Please contact us if interested.  Lead time is typically several months.

#2 and #4 hollow and rounds

#8 and #12 hollow and rounds

 

 

 

Match Planes (tongue and groove)

Match planes, or tongue and groove planes, are made in pairs with one plane cutting the groove and the other the tongue for making the tongue and groove joint.  Both planes are fenced and the pieces, when referenced from the same stock face, will line up flush when when put together.  The tongue plane is a standard side escapement plane and employs an iron with a slot in it the width of the finished tongue. The groove plane however is actually a type of fixed plow plane with a metal keel.  Because of the narrow profile this is necessary for strength, as wood simply would not have enough strength or ability to hold up under normal use.  The iron is located on the leading edge of the rear skate by means of a V groove cut into the back of the iron, and fits into the corresponding inverted V on the skate.  It is adjusted the same as any side escapement plane except for the fact the iron is not pressed against the blind side of the mortise, but rather located by the groove.

The prototype seen here is designed for 3/8″ thick stock.  The groove is 1/8″ thick and is centered. The groove is about .005″ wider than the tongue, allowing the boards to go together easily but without slop.  Both planes have the ability to be used on stock up to 1/2″ thick, but of course the tongue will then be offset, which generally is not an issue as long as care is taken to reference off the same face of each work piece. An offset tongue is actually beneficial if profiling the front faces of the boards with a bead or chamfer, as there is more stock between the face and the groove.  Plans are to offer both 3/8″ and 1/2″ sizes to begin with. (The 1/2″ size will work up to 5/8″ thick, and will have a groove width of 5/32″.)

Both planes will cut a groove 3/8″ deep and a tongue that is 1/4″ tall.  This ensures stock will butt together on the show faces, and also gives room for glue squeeze out when gluing boards together.  These small sizes are ideal for case backs when expansion needs to be accommodated. Simply nail in place and the tongue and groove joints allow for expansion and contraction while holding the boards in alignment.

Both planes are quarter sawn beech with tapered O-1 tool steel blades bedded at 50 degrees for heavier cutting.  Price for the pair will be $495.  Expected delivery for the first run will be early fall.  If interested, send me an email with the size you want, and I will add you to the list.  No down payment needed at this time.  You will be contacted when production is about to begin to confirm your order.

 

Match planes.

3/8″ size match planes.

Groove plane.  (small block is to hold the plane upright.)

Groove plane.

Groove plane.

Tongue plane.

Sample joint using 3/8″ stock.

Winding Sticks; Now in two sizes.

Winding sticks, 14″ in front, 22″ in rear

Winding sticks are again back in stock.  The standard 14″ size is still available, along with a longer 22″ version.  The added length can be beneficial with use on wide boards, or tasks such as flattening a bench top. The 22″ length means they will fit inside any tool chest sized for a #7 jointer plane, which are also 22″ in length, The 14″ sticks are more compact, and work best on narrower stock as they are easier to manipulate and are more stable when balancing on narrow boards. Both work the same way, and more information about these winding sticks can be found here.  They may be purchased from the store here.

Other changes we have made is to increase the thickness from 1/2″ at the base to 9/16″  This was accomplished by switching to 5/4 stock to start with, and offers more stability, especially on the longer sizes.  Finish has changed to Minwax Antique Oil, which offers a higher degree of protection than linseed oil.

We also would like to mention the presence of pin knots.  Pin knots are common in plain sawn walnut, and appear as small closed knots in the face of a board, usually near the center.  These are not considered a defect because of their small size.  When using quarter sawn stock, these knots show up running across the face of the board. Many of these winding sticks have them, as shown in the picture below.  None are open knots and they will not affect the performance of the tool.

Please note:  Because of the increase in cost of quarter sawn walnut, in part due to the thousand cankers disease, and the fact we are now using 5/4 stock, there will be a price increase from $50 to $55 in mid September.  We wanted to offer these initially at the same $50 price since so many are waiting for them.  The 22″ version will not change.  Thank you for your understanding .

Pin knot visible in the side of this winding stick.

Winding Sticks out of stock

Due to the recent blog post by Chris Schwarz on the Poplar Woodworking web site, there has been a surge in sales of winding sticks and current stock is depleted.  We will be making more, but it could be a couple of months before completion.  Signing up for our newsletter will allow anyone interested to know when they are again in stock as soon as it happens.  Thank you all for your support and patience.

 

New Spill Planes

A new batch of spill planes is has been completed, and there are several in the store. This run has, in addition to the spalted maple and black cherry, includes several in European Beech.  Each plane has been sharpened and test cut, and is ready to use right out of the box.  Most of these will be going to Handworks next week and will be offered for sale.  I do not have a stand there, but will have them at Sterling Tool Works booth.  I hope to be there myself on Friday, so please stop by to say hi.

Spill planes with test cut spills

VLUU L200 / Samsung L200

 

 

 

Side Bead Planes

We currently have a restock of improved side bead planes in the store.  These are available in bead sizes of 1/8″, 3/16″, 1/4″ and 3/8″.  It should be mentioned that our sizing is a measurement of the bead itself, and that the actual profile, including the quirk, is about 1/32″ wider than the bead size.  Thus the 1/8 is 5/32″ wide, the 3/16 is 7/32″, the 1/4 is 9/32″ and the 3/8″ is 13/32″.  More information about the side beads can be found here.

From left 1/8″, 3/16″, and 1/4″

Taking Orders for Side Beads

We are currently taking orders for side bead planes, the construction of which are now under way.  These will be offered in three sizes:  1/8″, 3/16″. and 1/4″.  Constructed of quarter sawn American Beech, with tapered O-1 tool steel irons, each plane is sharpened and test cut, and is ready to go right out of the box.  Expected delivery will be approximately the end of April.  Price is $275 each, plus shipping.  If interested, contact us and we will reserve any sizes you wish.  Payment will be due upon completion.  Quantities are limited to 8 planes in each size.

For more information about our side beads, click here.

Heels are stamped with sizes

The Cock Bead Plane

The cock bead plane is used to cut cock beading for drawer surrounds, either stuck onto the case sides of applied to rabbets cut into the drawer fronts.  Often found on period furniture, it provides both a visual detail to the drawer as well as protection to  veneered fronts, since the bead covers the edges of the drawer.  The cock bead differs from a side bead in a couple of ways:  There is no fence or depth stop, and the plane will also cut a fillet next to the bead, which is necessary when the beading is applied to the case itself.  When beading drawer dividers, both edges would receive a bead, and the material  between the beads will also be removed with this plane.  On the case sides, where only the inside edges get the bead,  the fillet will allow room for a conventional bench plane to be used to remove the remaining material on the outside edges.  Also, the iron tends to be bedded at a higher pitch because they are used going both directions and will encounter situations of working against the grain.  The plane we are producing was patterned after an original, is bedded at 60 degrees, and is only 7″ in length, making it extremely light weight and nimble to use.  Quartersawn American Beech is the wood of choice.   The bead is boxed using persimmon cut on a bias to match the bed angle of the iron.  We offer two sizes; 1/8″ and 3/16″.  Price is $250.  Available now in the store.

Below are some pointers for using the cock bead plane.

 

Cock bead planes, both 1/8″ and 3/16″

 

1/8″, left, and 3/16″

 

a comparison of the 7″ long cock bead plane  with a standard 10″ long 3/16″ side bead plane.

John M. Whelan, in his book The Wooden Plane, Its History Form, and Function,  says this of the cock bead plane:

“It is a molding plane with a semicircular groove in the sole. The iron matches and has horizontal cutting extensions on either side.”

I sharpened the iron in this way, and with some experimenting, I found that it was very difficult, if not impossible, to end up with a bead precisely at the edge of the board. Starting the cut was difficult without any fence or other guide.  The bead tended to either run off the board, or leave a fillet on the outside edge.  Next, the blade  was sharpened so that it faded into the corner of the bead on the blind side, and the horizontal extension on that side was ground back so it could not cut.  Now, to start the cut, the plane is tilted, and the semicircular groove served as a guide.  Shown below is the sequence I have found to cut very well.

First, draw some hash marks across the work piece with a pencil to gauge your progress.  Start the cut with the plane tilted slightly away from the work piece; just enough to allow the groove to act as a fence.  Take a couple of passes at this angle.  Placing your thumb on top of the plane in front of the wedge, with your fingers riding underneath against the stock. gives good control of the plane.

Starting the cut with the plane tilted slightly away from the work piece.  Note the pencil lines to gauge progress.

Once a track is established, gradually bring the plane into the vertical position over the next several passes. Once the plane is vertical, the fillet will be across to the escapement side of the plane.  It is important to hold the plane perpendicular to the stock so the fillet will be flat.  Also, keep the plane against the outside edge of the stock to ensure the bead does not run off the side.

Over the next several passes, bring the plane into the vertical position.

As the plane progresses, keep an eye on the top of the bead.  There is no depth stop, so use the pencil lines to know when to stop. One they disappear, full depth has been reached.  Often, abbreviated length cuts are necessary to keep the depth even.

 

Full depth has been reached.

Once the first side is completed, flip the stock around and repeat the process on the second side.  This becomes a bit more tricky, as you will need to watch both the bead depth and fillet depth in the center.  Leaning the plane a bit either way can help blend the center.  Most likely, there will be some tracks, which can be removes with a narrow scraper that fits into the space between the beads. In the photo below, both the bead and fillet are close to completion.  Note the pencil line on the bead.

Second side bead nearly complete.

Finished beading.  Note the tracks that should be scraped out with a narrow scraper.

Cutting a bead on 1/8″ or 3/16″ stock for applied cock beading is pretty straight forward.  Make a pass with the plane tilted first to one side, then the other, to break the corners.  Then plane straight down until the full profile is formed, keeping the plane pushed against the blind side.

When cutting either profile, keep the shavings from accumulating in the throat of the plane.  Thin narrow shavings have little beam strength, and can clog the plane.  Pull them clear after each pass.

The cock bead plane, with sampled of both applied (left) and stuck beading. (right)

 


Acer Ferrous Toolworks Garters

Paul Peters, of Acer Ferrous Toolworks, has developed additional components for the leg vice wood screw.   The garter, which is used to attach the wood screw to the chop (movable jaw) of the vice, is now available.  This allows the chop to move in conjunction with the hub of the screw when opening the vice.  There is no need to pull the chop open by hand.  The garters are 4″ square, and are split in half to allow for installation around the screw.  He is transitioning from a thickness of 3/8″ to 1/4″ for these garters, which will slip into the grove at the base of the screw hub.  Four countersunk screw holes, and supplied screws, are all that is needed for installation.  The garter can be oriented either  square or in a diamond position, as shown.

Garters is available in either solid brass, which can be purchased here, or in aluminum.  At this time, the remaining Aluminum garters that are 3/8″ thick are being sold as part of a discounted package which includes the screw with a matching groove. Both come with matching screws.

Acer Ferrous wood vice screw with brass garter and prototype handle.

 

Brass Garter with brass screws.

 

Aluminum garter with black anodize finish and screws.

 

 

Spill Planes again in the Store

The current run of spill planes is now available for purchase in our store.  There are three wood options;  American Beech, Black Cherry, and Maple, with some light figure and/or spalting.  All are priced at $135, plus shipping. For more details about the spill plane, click here.

VLUU L200 / Samsung L200

Spill planes in Beech, Cherry, and Spalted Maple

VLUU L200 / Samsung L200

Spill Plane in black cherry.

VLUU L200 / Samsung L200

Spill Plane in American Beech

VLUU L200 / Samsung L200

Spill Plane in Spalted Maple