Category Archives: Panel Raising Plane

Panel Raisers back in stock

We currently have several panel raising planes in stock in our store.  They are listed individually to show the variations in wood grain and spalting.  Also, one of these planes is designed to be used on stock that is 15/16″ thick. This would be appropriate for frames that are 1″ thick or more.  The reveal is the same at 1″, with a total profile that is 1 3/8″ wide, with 3/8″ being the tang that fits into the stiles and rails.  Price is $595.  For more information, visit the panel raiser post here.

VLUU L200 / Samsung L200

Completed panel raisers, several which are available.

VLUU L200 / Samsung L200

Panel raising planes

Panel Raisers Coming Along

The panel raising planes are in progress, with the mouths of the bodies all cut out and the wedges fitted.  This is perhaps the most time consuming operations of making these planes.  While there is still a lot of work to be done, these are off to a strong start.  This is the beech that I traveled to Indiana for in January, and I am pleased with it.  There is a fair amount of spalting present, but it is not punky or soft, and I am able to limit it to the tops of the bodies.  This ensures that the sole of the planes are defect free and will have the best wearing characteristics.

The next operation will be to cut the knicker mortises, and make and fit wedges for the knicker blades.  Compared to the skewed mouths and wedges, this will be easy!

Finished mouth for skewed iron.

Finished mouth for skewed iron.

Wedges fit.

Wedges fit.

The wedges shown above are left long during shaping to make it easier to hold with a clamp.  Once the lower end is complete, they will be cut to length.

Anyone interested, let me know.  I still have a couple available.  $595

Panel Raising Planes under way

After a longer delay than I liked, the panel raiser planes are getting started.  It took a while to track down appropriate wood for these planes.  Finding 12/4 quarter sawn American Beech is a challenge, but I now have enough to make several batches of these planes. I am also making several changes from the original design that I feel will be an improvement to their performance and comfort.  The blades will be 5/32″ thick, up from 1/8″.  The bed angle is increasing to 45 degrees, from 40 degrees, which will help improve the finish on the long grain sides of a panel.  The body will be slightly taller, with a more sculpted back for greater use comfort. Unfortunately,  I had to raise the price to cover additional costs and time to make.  The new price is $595.

Shown here are the blanks rough cut and acclimating to the shop environment.  I will be making these in small batches of ten at a time because of the complexity and time involved.  If anyone wants to reserve a copy, please let me know.  No money down, and no obligation, but it does ensure one is available when completed.

Beech blanks for panel raiser planes.

Beech blanks for panel raiser planes.

Progress with Planes, Taking orders.

The hollow and rounds that I have orders for are coming along.  I hope to have them completed in a couple of weeks, and then I will be starting more panel raising planes and spill planes.  Because this business is currently a part time endeavor, progress is slower than I would like.  My hope is that in the future I can devote more time, and perhaps make it a full time venture.  I thank all for their interest and support as I get things rolling.

Hollow & Rounds with irons ready to heat treat

Hollow & Rounds with irons ready to heat treat

Shown here are the 24 hollow and rounds, sizes #4, #6, & #8.  These are sold, but I have more blanks ready to go once I get some other tools made.  If interested, contact me about reserving any.  Sold as a pair, $395.  Probably next year for completion.  Click here for more details about the planes.

Panel Raising Plane with a sample cut.

Panel Raising Plane with a sample cut.

I have a couple of orders for the Panel Raising plane, and I plan to get started next month.  If anyone would like to reserve one, let me know.  Cost is $695.  More information can be found here.

Only One Available: Panel Raising Plane

My first batch of panel raising planes was only a run of five, as I wanted to test the market before making a bigger batch, and I could get five blades out of a 36″ bar of O-1 tool steel.  I have only one left, and it is now for sale in the store.  I plan to make more, but they will be a while since I have other tools I need to make first.  My best guess is late this year or early next, and yes, I plan to make more then five next time.  A big thank you to those who have already purchased this plane.  Read more about it here.

Panel Raising Plane with a sample cut.

Panel Raising Plane with a sample cut.

 

Panel Raising Plane back view

Panel Raising Plane back view

Ready to use Tools

Panel Raising Plane with test cut panel and User Guide.

Panel Raising Plane with test cut panel and User Guide.

Spill plane with test spills ready to ship.

Spill plane with test spills ready to ship.

When a customer orders a plane from Red Rose Reproductions,  they can be assured that it has been individually tested in the shop before shipping.  In fact, a test piece, or a bundle of spills, goes in the box with plane.  They also come with a users guide for assistance in set up, use and care of the tool.  I want satisfied customers, and believe this to be a top priority.

Also, I am planning to have the panel raising plane available at the Lie-Nielsen event in July, after which it will be available here in the store.

Panel Raising Planes ready for Finish

The next few panel raising planes are complete except for the finish, which will be started today.  I only have three in this partial batch, so if anyone is interested, do not wait too long.  They will be listed in the store as soon as they are done. I hope to make more in the future, but there are other projects coming first, and it may be a while until these are available again.  These are made of quarter sawn American Beech, with O-1 blades, sharp and ready to go out of the box.  More information about these planes is available in this post.  Here are the results in a test cut using poplar.

VLUU L200  / Samsung L200

Progress with the Panel Raising Plane

The next few Panel Raising Planes are taking shape, with the wedge fitting completed.  This along with cutting and truing the throat are the most time consuming and challenging part of making this tool.  I wanted to show a few pictures of the process to illustrate how I go about it.  First, the sides of the abutments are carefully floated flat, especially the left side, where the blade will be registered against.

VLUU L200  / Samsung L200

Notice the many layout lines.  Some are knifed in, while others are penciled.  Starting with a flat square blank, and having accurate layout lines is essential.  I should also note that I use several floats with modified sides ground at about 15 deg. for getting into the acute corners.  This is what the nearly finished mouth looks like.

VLUU L200  / Samsung L200

The wedge is a challenge to cut and hold.  The blank is made with plenty of extra length which gives a place to clamp to.After ripping the two sides of the wedge blank at an angle on the table saw, I use a simple fixture that holds the wedge at the same skew angle as when it is in the plane, and cut the wedge taper of 12 deg. on the bandsaw.

VLUU L200  / Samsung L200

 The need for the extra length is apparent in this photo, giving a place for the clamp to hold the wedge in such a way that it does not interfere with the plane when smoothing the top of the taper. (The clamp tip can just be seen at the extreme left of the photo.) It is clamped to a piece of scrap wood in the vice. This is trial and error until the wedge fits snugly on both sides, and top and bottom.  I aim for a fit that will wedge in place with hand pressure.  I will use a pencil to darken the top of the tapers, and set the wedge with a hammer.  After releasing, I look for a transfer of the pencil along both sides, indicating good contact with the wedge.

VLUU L200  / Samsung L200

The last step is to check the bed for full contact of the blade at the mouth opening.  I use a candle to soot the bottom of the blade, and place into the plane.  After setting the wedge, the blade is advanced a few taps, and removed from the body.  The high spots show up from the soot, and are carefully floated away until the area at the mouth is where full contact is being made.  Sometimes the wedge needs minor adjusting during this process.  After this process, the wedge is ready for the final shaping.  The sole of the plane will be finished, and the blade ground to match, and heat treated.  I will sharpen and test each plane until it cuts well, and then clean up all surfaces, and add chamfers and other details. Anyone interested in this plane is encouraged to contact me since there are only a few to finish out this batch, and I am not sure when they will be made again with the other projects I am planning.

VLUU L200  / Samsung L200

Results with the Panel Raiser

I made a small raised panel in walnut with the Panel Raising plane to observe how it would do in a hardwood going all four directions.  As an experiment, I ran across the grain at one end last, which is not the ideal order because of the risk if tear out.  Cross grain should be done first.  However, the observer would not be able to tell which end was done “incorrectly”, because there is no discernible tear out on any of the corners.  This is due to the fact that the blade is sharply skewed, and also because of the cross grain nicker that severs the fibers along the fillet before the blade makes its cut.VLUU L200  / Samsung L200

The other challenge is to get good results on the side of the panel where the plane is running against the grain.  While the chosen wood should be as straight as possible, there will inevitably be some areas where the plane is going uphill.  This photo shows the worst area, which does have some minor tearing, but would be considered more than acceptable in a handmade piece.  The panel shown is straight off the plane, with no sanding or scraping done to it.  VLUU L200  / Samsung L200

When the plane reaches both the bench top and the top of the field, it will stop cutting.  This plane is meant to be used on 3/4″ thick stock, and will leave a straight section of 1/4″ thickness to fit into the groove in the stiles and rails. Not the spring line on the front of the plane, which is a good visual reference when using to keep the plane vertical.  Also note that the nicker is also in a vertical position.  The bulk of the material was removed with a jack plane to save wear on the panel plane.  The jack can be set aggressively to speed the task up.

VLUU L200  / Samsung L200

The Panel Raising Plane

Panel Raising Plane

Panel Raising Plane

The panel raising plane is currently out of stock.  Anyone interested in purchasing one should contact us for an estimated delivery. Signing up for the newsletter will give advanced notice of  upcoming production plans.    

We are pleased to announce the introduction of our next product, the Panel Raising Plane.  Based loosely on a design by plane maker Tod Herrli, this plane will cut a 1/8″ deep fillet around the field of a panel, along with a 1 3/8″ wide bevel that slopes down to the last 3/8″, which then becomes a 1/4″ thick tang that will fit into the groove of the stiles and rails in the frame.  With a blade bedded at 45 deg and skewed at 30 deg, it will cut cleanly on both long and end grain.  It is designed for use with 3/4″ thick stock, and will stop cutting when the finished depth is reached. The plane is different from most panel planes in that it is only 10″ long; similar in length to molding planes.  Being shorter is an advantage when raising short or narrow panels, as it is easier to control. Because the panel would already be flat, the extra length is not needed.  The back is contoured for the user’s palm to sit comfortably when pushing.

VLUU L200 / Samsung L200

Panel Raiser with profiled sample

VLUU L200 / Samsung L200

Panel Raiser rear view

VLUU L200 / Samsung L200

Throat detail showing skewed blade

VLUU L200 / Samsung L200

Scoring knife detail

VLUU L200 / Samsung L200

Contoured rear handhold

The plane features a scoring knife to sever the grain in front of the blade to prevent tear out when doing the end grain.  The blade is 5/32″ thick o-1 tool steel, (the scoring knife is 1/8″ thick), hardened and sharpened for use.  The irons are also tapered in thickness.  The wood used is quarter sawn American Beech, finished with Minwax Antique Oil Finish.   To visit the store, click here.  Come and see it at our upcoming shows!