Monthly Archives: February 2017

Taking Orders for Side Beads

We are currently taking orders for side bead planes, the construction of which are now under way.  These will be offered in three sizes:  1/8″, 3/16″. and 1/4″.  Constructed of quarter sawn American Beech, with tapered O-1 tool steel irons, each plane is sharpened and test cut, and is ready to go right out of the box.  Expected delivery will be approximately the end of April.  Price is $275 each, plus shipping.  If interested, contact us and we will reserve any sizes you wish.  Payment will be due upon completion.  Quantities are limited to 8 planes in each size.

For more information about our side beads, click here.

Heels are stamped with sizes

The Cock Bead Plane

The cock bead plane is used to cut cock beading for drawer surrounds, either stuck onto the case sides of applied to rabbets cut into the drawer fronts.  Often found on period furniture, it provides both a visual detail to the drawer as well as protection to  veneered fronts, since the bead covers the edges of the drawer.  The cock bead differs from a side bead in a couple of ways:  There is no fence or depth stop, and the plane will also cut a fillet next to the bead, which is necessary when the beading is applied to the case itself.  When beading drawer dividers, both edges would receive a bead, and the material  between the beads will also be removed with this plane.  On the case sides, where only the inside edges get the bead,  the fillet will allow room for a conventional bench plane to be used to remove the remaining material on the outside edges.  Also, the iron tends to be bedded at a higher pitch because they are used going both directions and will encounter situations of working against the grain.  The plane we are producing was patterned after an original, is bedded at 60 degrees, and is only 7″ in length, making it extremely light weight and nimble to use.  Quartersawn American Beech is the wood of choice.   The bead is boxed using persimmon cut on a bias to match the bed angle of the iron.

The first run was small to test the market, and, judging by the interest, most likely these will be produced again in the future.  Price is $250.

Currently out of stock.  To learn when the next run will be made, and have first opportunity to reserve a plane, sign up for the Red Rose Reproductions Newsletter.

Below are some pointers for using the cock bead plane.

Cock Bead Plane

a comparison of the 7″ long cock bead plane  with a standard 10″ long 3/16″ side bead plane.

John M. Whelan, in his book The Wooden Plane, Its History Form, and Function,  says this of the cock bead plane:

“It is a molding plane with a semicircular groove in the sole. The iron matches and has horizontal cutting extensions on either side.”

I sharpened the iron in this way, and with some experimenting, I found that it was very difficult, if not impossible, to end up with a bead precisely at the edge of the board. Starting the cut was difficult without any fence or other guide.  The bead tended to either run off the board, or leave a fillet on the outside edge.  Next, the blade  was sharpened so that it faded into the corner of the bead on the blind side, and the horizontal extension on that side was ground back so it could not cut.  Now, to start the cut, the plane is tilted, and the semicircular groove served as a guide.  Shown below is the sequence I have found to cut very well.

First, draw some hash marks across the work piece with a pencil to gauge your progress.  Start the cut with the plane tilted slightly away from the work piece; just enough to allow the groove to act as a fence.  Take a couple of passes at this angle.  Placing your thumb on top of the plane in front of the wedge, with your fingers riding underneath against the stock. gives good control of the plane.

Starting the cut with the plane tilted slightly away from the work piece.  Note the pencil lines to gauge progress.

Once a track is established, gradually bring the plane into the vertical position over the next several passes. Once the plane is vertical, the fillet will be across to the escapement side of the plane.  It is important to hold the plane as perpendicular to the stock so the fillet will be flat.  Also, keep the plane against the outside edge of the stock to ensure the bead does not run off the side.

Over the next several passes, bring the plane into the vertical position.

As the plane progresses, keep an eye on the top of the bead.  There is no depth stop, so use the pencil lines to know when to stop. One they disappear, full depth has been reached.  Often, abbreviated length cuts are necessary to keep the depth even.

 

Full depth has been reached.

Once the first side is completed, flip the stock around and repeat the process on the second side.  This becomes a bit more tricky, as you will need to watch both the bead depth and fillet depth in the center.  Leaning the plane a bit either way can help blend the center.  Most likely, there will be some tracks, which can be removes with a narrow scraper that fits into the space between the beads. In the photo below, both the bead and fillet are close to completion.  Note the pencil line on the bead.

Second side bead nearly complete.

Finished beading.  Note the tracks that should be scraped out with a narrow scraper.

Cutting a bead on 3/16″ stock for applied cock beading is pretty straight forward.  Make a pass with the plane tilted first to one side, then the other, to break the corners.  Then plane straight down until the full profile is formed, keeping the plane pushed against the blind side.

When cutting either profile, keep the shavings from accumulating in the throat of the plane.  Thin narrow shavings have little beam strength, and can clog the plane.  Pull them clear after each pass.

The cock bead plane, with sampled of both applied (left) and stuck beading. (right)

 


Newsletter now available

As a means to inform customers of upcoming products and offers, we are now offering the Red Rose Reproductions Newsletter.  This newsletter will be an occasional occurrence, only issued when there is news about soon to be offered tools, and will not clutter your inbox with junk.  It is designed to give you, a valued subscriber, a first chance to reserve a copy of sometimes limited tools.  Sign up now to be one of the first to know what is coming!

Below is a screenshot of part of the first newsletter we published.