Monthly Archives: May 2015

Bench Hooks now Available!

Bench hooks provide a very efficient and solid method of capturing a work piece in order to saw, pare or otherwise work with small pieces of wood.  The hooks are pushed against the front of the bench, and the work piece is placed against the hooks, which keeps the work piece from moving away from the user.  Sawing or paring will push the work piece against the hooks, and needs only light pressure to hold in place.

VLUU L200 / Samsung L200

These hooks are patterned from ones made by Roy Underhill, as seen here.  Made from soft maple, they are constructed from one piece of wood.  One added feature these hooks have is a rabbet along the side of one of the hooks, which gives the saw a place to go rather than cutting into the workbench. The rabbet is cut onto both sides of the hook, which gives twice the life to the tool, as it can be flipped over. Thus, one of the hooks is 1/2″ wider than the other.  This is available either on the left or right, depending on the users sawing preference. The narrower hook is used as a support, and can be placed any distance from the first hook, depending on the work piece length and operation being preformed.

VLUU L200 / Samsung L200

The shoulders are cut with a slight undercut, which will help ensure that the work piece is seated against the shoulder.  This also allows the bench hook to be used as a hold down when placed in a vice, similar to a holdfast.  The large radius protects the hook from splitting off if the end is struck to secure the work piece.  Note in the photo that there is a block of wood between the hook and vice jaw, which is necessary when using a leg vice.  Vices with short jaw heights do not need a block since the lower hook would be below the vice.

VLUU L200 / Samsung L200

VLUU L200 / Samsung L200

VLUU L200 / Samsung L200

This photo below shows the bench hooks in use.  Please note this is my demonstration model, which has the rabbet on both sides for both right and left handed users.

VLUU L200 / Samsung L200

These hooks are now manufactured using a milling machine to cut the ramped areas. It is difficult to eliminate tear out due to the cutting action of an end mill, so these hooks may display some on the stock surfaces as seen below.  We feel this is acceptable for bench hooks because they are a “consumable” tool that are meant to be sacrificed instead of the workbench by absorbing the saw as it cuts through the work piece, and eventually will need replacing.  More importantly, the surfaces of the hooks are more parallel than in  the past, and offer a more stable working surface.

            They are left unfinished, which is preferred by most users. Over all length is between 11 1/2″ and 12″, depending on the raw material. (Wood is often sold in an even foot length.)  Width of the wider hook is 3″, and the narrower is 2 1/2″  Thickness between the hooks is approximately 1/2″, with approx 1/2″ high hooks. Price is $50 plus shipping, and are sold as a pair.  Available for purchase here.

Results with the Panel Raiser

I made a small raised panel in walnut with the Panel Raising plane to observe how it would do in a hardwood going all four directions.  As an experiment, I ran across the grain at one end last, which is not the ideal order because of the risk if tear out.  Cross grain should be done first.  However, the observer would not be able to tell which end was done “incorrectly”, because there is no discernible tear out on any of the corners.  This is due to the fact that the blade is sharply skewed, and also because of the cross grain nicker that severs the fibers along the fillet before the blade makes its cut.VLUU L200  / Samsung L200

The other challenge is to get good results on the side of the panel where the plane is running against the grain.  While the chosen wood should be as straight as possible, there will inevitably be some areas where the plane is going uphill.  This photo shows the worst area, which does have some minor tearing, but would be considered more than acceptable in a handmade piece.  The panel shown is straight off the plane, with no sanding or scraping done to it.  VLUU L200  / Samsung L200

When the plane reaches both the bench top and the top of the field, it will stop cutting.  This plane is meant to be used on 3/4″ thick stock, and will leave a straight section of 1/4″ thickness to fit into the groove in the stiles and rails. Not the spring line on the front of the plane, which is a good visual reference when using to keep the plane vertical.  Also note that the nicker is also in a vertical position.  The bulk of the material was removed with a jack plane to save wear on the panel plane.  The jack can be set aggressively to speed the task up.

VLUU L200  / Samsung L200